Vaccines, Medicare, Minorities and More: New Reports From the National Academies Press

November 1, 2011

Check out these new titles and prepublications available from The National Academies Press (http://www.nap.edu/). All NAP titles can be read online or downloaded in PDF format free of charge! NAP publishes authoritative reports issued by the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council.

Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality (prepublication), Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, edited by Kathleen Stratton, Andrew Ford, Erin Rusch, and Ellen Wright Clayton

Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies (2011), Institute of Medicine, edited by Leann L. Birch, Lynn Parker, and Annina Burns

Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads (2011), Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy

Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment: Phase I: Improving Accuracy (prepublication), Second Edition, Board on Health Care Services

The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding (2011), Board on the Health of Select Populations


Consumer Health Information Regarding Prescription Drug Abuse

July 25, 2011

An article featured in last week’s Tulsa World reported that in the state of Oklahoma, more people overdose from prescription pills than from street drugs (Aspinwall 2011, A10).

Read the full article here.

While recent laws in Oklahoma mandate the monitoring of certain prescription drugs by the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control, patient education is a key factor to combating our state’s prescription pill problem.

The following list includes online consumer health resources pertaining to prescription drug abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse

A Guide to Safe Use of Pain Medicine, FDA’s Consumer Updates

Misuse of Prescription Pain Relievers: The Buzz Takes Your Breath Away… Permanently, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

NIDA InfoFacts: Prescription and Over-the-Counter Medications, National Institute on Drug Abuse

Prescription Drug Abuse, Mayo Clinic

Prescription Drug Abuse, MedlinePlus

Relevant Research Articles

Paulozzi LJ, Kilbourne EM, Desai HA. Prescription drug monitoring programs and death rates from drug overdose. Pain Medicine. 2011; 12(5):747-54. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21332934. Accessed July 18, 2011.

Paulozzi LJ, Weisler RH, Patkar AA. 2011. A national epidemic  of unintentional prescription opioid overdose deaths: How physicians can help control it. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2011; 75(5):589-92. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21536000. Accessed July 18, 2011.

Article Citation

Aspinwall C. Killing Pain – and people. Tulsa World. July 17, 2011: A1, A10. http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=11&articleid=20110717_11_A1_bDispa203271&archive=yes. Accessed July 18, 2011.


Faculty Publication: Hoppes, Segal

July 13, 2011

Hoppes, S., & Segal, R. (2010). Reconstructing meaning through occupation after the death of a family member: Accommodation, assimilation, and continuing bonds. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64(1), 133-141.

Reactions to death have been studied extensively from psychological, behavioral, and physiological perspectives. Occupational adaptation to loss has received scant attention. Qualitative research was undertaken to identify and describe occupational responses in bereavement The constant comparative approach was used to analyze and interpret the occupational responses. Adaptive strategies of occupational accommodation and assimilation were used after the death of a family member. Desire to sustain bonds with the deceased motivated specific occupational engagements. These occupational responses served to reconstruct meaning after the death of a family member. These findings contribute to understanding adaptation after death by adding an occupational perspective to previous theories. Occupational therapists’ abilities to support clients after loss can be enhanced through appreciation of occupational accommodation and assimilation and the role of continuing occupational bonds after the death of a loved one. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

Link to article record in Schusterman Library catalog, and possible full-text

Do you have a publication? Let the library know!


24% U.S. Counties Report More Deaths than Births

June 30, 2011

Last year, more people died than were born in nearly one-quarter of all U.S. counties, a new study shows.

This trend, known as natural decrease, is the result of younger people moving away, as well as decreases in fertility levels. Researchers from the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) also found that rural areas are particularly hard hit by natural population decrease, which is taking a toll on local schools, hospitals and other family services.

“Last year, 24 percent of all U.S. counties experienced natural decrease. And, for the first time in U.S. history, deaths now exceed births in an entire state,” Kenneth Johnson, senior demographer with the Carsey Institute and professor of sociology at UNH, said in a university news release.

The state to which Johnson referred was West Virginia, the study revealed. Another key study finding: more than 90 percent of U.S. counties with a natural decrease are in rural America.


Free Ebook Downloads from the National Academies Press

June 21, 2011

Are you a digital reader? If so, you might be interested in the following news. On June 2nd, the National Academies Press (NAP) began offering the PDF versions of their reports and books as FREE downloads.

Who is the National Academies? The National Academies is a collection of four private, nonprofit institutions: the National Academy of Science, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Center. Each year, the NAP publishes over 200 authoritative books and reports that address science, engineering, and health topics.

More the 4000 NAP titles are now freely available to download. Users can choose to download entire books or individual chapters. To download a book, visit the NAP website at http://www.nap.edu/. Select a topic to browse (for example, Behavioral and Social Sciences, Education, Food & Nutrition, and Health and Medicine) and explore the available titles. Once you select a title, look for the DOWNLOAD FREE PDF option. To complete the download, you will need to create an NAP user account or register as a guest.

The following list comprises a small sampling of NAP titles:


HealthResearchFunding.Org assists unfunded research projects

June 3, 2011

Each year, there are numerous research proposals for promising new treatments that make their way through a peer-review process but do not receive funding, although they have the potential to make significant contribution to scientific discovery. The National Health Council (NHC), with input from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has developed a web database designed to bring researchers together with patient advocacy organizations and other funding sources. It’s called HealthResearchFunding.Org.

By using this database, potential research supporters among NHC membership and those outside the NHC community can avoid duplication of effort and more efficiently identify and evaluate NIH-reviewed research proposals. By utilizing the HealthReserachFunding.Org database, researchers gain an organized and unvarying environment in which to exhibit their proposals alongside their peers. Their respective research institutions could spend less time, effort, and resources looking for financial support and more time conducting research to aid in the development of new treatments for patients.


Help for Flood Victims

May 18, 2011

The MedlinePlus consumer health web site (medlineplus.gov) has created a page that links individuals to web sites providing high quality information on floods and flooding. You’ll find links to FEMA, CDC, EPA and Department of Homeland Security web sites to assist those needing information on topics such as flood disaster plans, cleanup, mold, air quality, power outages, water safety, repairing your flooded home and more.